Satellites pictures show Brazil's Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate

Brazil Space agency also revealed that the rainforest is burning at a record rate with the help of the REUTERS/NASA image. More than 70,000 fires have been detected this year.

Satellites pictures show Brazil's Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate
Satellites pictures show Brazil's Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate

Satellites pictures show Brazil's Amazon rainforest is burning at a record rate

Brazil's Amazon rainforest fire in 2019 has doubled the number of fires than in 2013. Amazon rainforest, home of millions of species of flora & fauna and one million indigenous people, has turned the day into night with its thick black smoke.

Amazon rainforest of Brazil covers most of the north-western region of Brazil. It extends into Columbia, Peru and some South American countries and is said to be the world's largest tropical rainforest. They produce 20% of the total oxygen in our atmosphere, therefore known as the planet's lungs.

According to the US space agency NASA, the overall fire activity this year was below average. Though the activity is found to be higher in Amazons and Rondonia, it has descended in the States of Mato Grosso and Para.

What satellite images are speaking?

Copernicus, the European Union's satellite program has released a map that shows how the smoke from the fires is spreading all along the atmosphere, starting from Brazil to the east Atlantic coast. It is clear from the map that the smoke has covered almost half of the country. Even the nearby places like Peru, Bolivia and Paraguay are not left unaffected.

Brazil Space agency also revealed that the rainforest is burning at a record rate with the help of the REUTERS/NASA image. More than 70,000 fires have been detected this year. During summer months, Brazil suffers a record-breaking heat which acts as a catalyst for the wildfires. Deforestation is another well-known reason for this.

These distressing fires are visible from the space, and our satellites take no time to map them out and help us getting alert for the worse consequences. CO2 levels have also increased at a shocking rate due to the fires.

***Brazil's Largest City Plunges into Darkness

Brazil's space research centre, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), found that these wildfires hit a record number this year, i.e. 72,843. It means there is a remarkable increase of about 83% as compared to in 2018, in the same period. INPE fire hazard map is showing the Amazon fires satellite image and the risk of wildfires across South America.

Now coming to the NASA images, they have also confirmed the wildfire with their high-resolution images. MODIS on NASA's Aqua satellite captured these images. MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer)  on NASA's satellite monitors the Earth's atmosphere, ocean and land surface with its visible, NIR, MIR and thermal channels.

The active fire and burned area products of MODIS are able to detect fires in 1-2 km pixels. "NASA's satellite, airborne and field research capture the full impact of fires in the Earth system, from rapid detection of  actively burning fires, transport of smoke and changes in ecosystems in the days to decades following fire", said Doug Morton, a research scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Centre in Greenbelt, Maryland.

this #Sentinel3 OLCI capture from 14 August 2019, shows a significant amount of smoke, and fire outbreaks over the #Amazonas and #Rondonia states #Amazonia #Brasil

Some more images

NASA Earth Observatory images by Lauren Dauphin, using MODIS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview and VIIRS data from NASA EOSDIS/LANCE and GIBS/Worldview, and the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership