Phase 2 of FAA’s UTM pilot program concludes at New York UAS test site

Several capabilities and services were demonstrated that will enable safe, high-density Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or drone operations, officials told Observer-Dispatch.

Phase 2 of FAA’s UTM pilot program concludes at New York UAS test site
Phase 2 of FAA’s UTM pilot program concludes at New York UAS test site

Phase 2 of FAA’s UTM pilot program concludes at New York UAS test site

Phase two of the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) unmanned aircraft traffic management pilot program (UPP) has been successfully completed at the New York UAS Test Site at Griffiss International Airport in Rome.

Several capabilities and services were demonstrated that will enable safe, high-density Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or drone operations, officials told Observer-Dispatch.

This includes remote identification services that will help observers identify nearby UAS, detect and avoid technology to prevent collisions, and public safety operations.

A team of over 40 people from 13 different organizations begun collaborating virtually since mid-April this year, conducting three weeks of live flights and component testing throughout November.

Oneida County Executive Anthony J. Picente Jr. said, “The completion of the FAA’s UPP Phase Two testing at Griffiss International Airport is a monumental accomplishment that Oneida County and its partners should be very proud of. It was an honor that our UAS Test Site, which is one of only seven in the nation to begin with, was selected to lead this effort. Our region continues to set the bar for UAS traffic management and to lead the globe in drone innovation.”

Besides high-density operations and UTM functionality, several other technologies and capabilities were tested and approved, including Remote Identification, which effectively serves as a sort of “license plate” for drones.

Sheriffs from Oneida County, Albany County, and Washington County tested out their drones and their effectiveness in implementing restricted airspace and reserving it for emergency operations.

This helps the user create a “no-fly” zone in a specific area, alerting non-authorized drones nearby. It also sends instructions to the said drones to exit the airspace to avoid any interference with emergency medical operations, rescue operations, and more.

ResilienX and TruWeather Solutions were the local partners for the program, providing health-monitoring systems and real-time micro weather forecasting respectively, which allowed the team to plan flight tests based on predictive weather conditions.