Drones in the Protection of Civilians in Times of Armed Warfare

Majority of the people are not aware that the United Nations Peacekeepers have been using drones since 2013 to protect civilians from warfare.

Drones in the Protection of Civilians in Times of Armed Warfare
Drones in the Protection of Civilians in Times of Armed Warfare

Drones in the Protection of Civilians in Times of Armed Warfare

We’ve witnessed drones increasingly becoming a part of modern warfare strategies, equipment, and ammunition. While the critics talk about the ills of drones and how they are a severe threat and how they’re only in the news for wrong reasons, the other side of the story talks about the benefits of drones in times of distress.

Drones are unmanned aerial systems (UAVs) that can be operated by an on-ground pilot. Majority of the people are not aware that the United Nations Peacekeepers have been using drones since 2013 to protect civilians from warfare. These drones do not carry weapons and differ from the war drones. Drones have untapped potential to save lives, and we’re closer to a world where peacekeeping becomes safer, and lives are protected through these powerful aircraft.

The first thing to understand in a situation like this is that war is a common phenomenon in today’s time. Violence has become the answer to almost everything around the world, and we see some transformational changes in warfare in the 21st century. United Nations is often asked to intervene in situations between countries and in places where violence erupts due to political unrest. Their aim is to reduce conflict in these warring regions and reduce violence. 

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With the evolution of war has come an evolution in peacekeeping. For one may say that help really might be in the air. Drones are used by peacekeepers in civilian areas to gather information and keep a database of the people. Although the United Nations is doing this, there are no reported cases where drones have triggered peacekeeper movements and saved lives, at least not as of now.

This does not mean there is no hope. It simply means we need much more knowledge and understanding of how drones can be used to execute civilian help in times of crisis. 

We also need to understand that enough number of drones need to be deployed for them to be effective. For example, there were five drones deployed to cover almost a million square miles of area, but they only had the funds to use one of them at a time. We need to understand the financial implications of drone deployment for governments and organisations at large. 

Another factor that comes into play is the deployment of drones in the right places. While there are war areas where it is difficult to pinpoint a crucial zone, it is important to identify and monitor areas where the threat might be high. The utilisation of a resource like a drone can work best when it is used in the right place at the right time.

The drones used by the United Nations are unarmed, and their data is regularly submitted and recorded by their pilots. Drones still have untapped potential that can help expand the scale of civilian protection and someday maybe even save lives autonomously.